All posts by Rev. Paul M. Turner

Founding and Senior Pastor of Gentle Spirit Christian Church, Rev. Paul M. Turner grew up in suburban Chicago and was ordained by the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches in 1989. He was called to Atlanta in 1994 to pastor All Saints MCC. Five years later he founded Gentle Spirit Christian Church. He lives in Decatur with his husband Bill, who he met in 1982 while living and working in Ohio and legally married in 2015.

This Week’s Message

WELCOME TO THE NEW WEEK

“So, chosen by God for this new life of love, dress in the wardrobe God picked out for you: compassion, kindness, humility, quiet strength, discipline. Be even-tempered, content with second place, quick to forgive an offense. Forgive as quickly and completely as the Master forgave you. And regardless of what else you put on, wear love. It’s your basic, all-purpose garment. Never be without it.”  Colossians 3:13-14 (MSG)

This Week’s Message

WELCOME TO THE NEW WEEK
“Instead, if you really change your ways and your actions, if you act justly toward one another, if you no longer oppress the foreigner, the fatherless, and the widow and no longer shed innocent blood in this place or follow other gods, bringing harm on yourselves, I will allow you to live in this place, the land I gave to your ancestors long ago and forever.”  Jeremiah 7:5-7 Holman Christian Standard Bible

 

This Week’s Message

PRESS RELEASE:

Monday, June 8, 2020, Decatur, Georgia 

Contact:

Rev. Dr. David Jordan, Senior Minister, First Baptist Church of Decatur

704-724-2766

davidjordan319@gmail.com

Rev. Dr. James L. Brewer-Calvert, Senior Pastor, First Christian Church of Decatur

404-229-2326

citykid4evr@gmail.com

“A Statement from Decatur’s White Clergy on Racism and Justice” 

38 Ministers in Decatur Support Black Lives Matter 

and Repent of Professional and Congregational Racism

38 white ministers representing 8 Christian denominations and thousands of local congregants issued a public, pastoral letter addressing racism and justice.

On Sunday, June 7, the statement was read aloud in many of their church services and is being posted on church social media.

The clergy signees are ordained in the Baptist, Catholic, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist, Non-Denominational, and Presbyterian traditions.  Their churches are located in and around downtown Decatur, a diverse and vibrant city of 30,000 citizens adjacent to Atlanta.

The statement reads:

“A Statement from Decatur’s White Clergy on Racism and Justice” 

Black Lives Matter. We name that unequivocal truth. Black lives matter to God.

We speak to you as white ordained leaders of Decatur churches that for generations have sought to be faithful to the gospel of Jesus Christ. However, our beloved churches have fallen short of our call and commission to live fully into Christ’s call because we have embraced the self-serving corruption of systemic racism. Too many of our Decatur churches were planted in soil tainted with racism. Too many of our Decatur churches harvested the fruit of that racism. And like too many of our predecessors, we who now serve as your shepherds have been too silent, too complicit in those systems because they benefit us. As the prophet Jeremiah writes, “[We] have treated the wound of [God’s] people carelessly, saying, ‘Peace, peace,’ when there is no peace.”

The recent murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd force us to see what our fellow black clergy have long told us: that systemic racism is not only embedded in our city, our state, and our nation, it is also embedded in our churches and in us, your clergy.

As people set apart to be servant leaders, we ask God and God’s people to hear our repentance, and if God and God’s people are willing, to forgive us.

We have been silent. We will no longer be silent. As white clergy, we must engage in the faithful, ongoing work of dismantling racism, anti-blackness, and white supremacy, beginning with ourselves and our churches. Our posture must be one of humility and decentering ourselves. We must listen to and follow the leadership of our black clergy colleagues who have led this work for so long, and support their work with our labor and resources.

We trust that by his judgment, Jesus calls us to account for our sin. We trust that by his incarnation, crucifixion, and resurrection, Jesus does not leave us stuck in our shame, guilt, or fear. We have this hope that Christ lifts us into new life, together.

We call on you, Christ’s gathered body throughout Decatur, to join us in this work and to demand this work from us. Being anti-racist and pro-justice is not separate from the work of the church; this is at the core of the church’s work. We covenant with you to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ. Imagine our churches truly living into God’s vision for them.

Black lives matter to God and they must matter to every one of God’s people gathered today in our churches.

 

Signed:

Rev. Jack Amick, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Susan Amick, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Dr. James Brewer-Calvert, First Christian Church of Decatur (Disciples of Christ)

Rev. Lauren Colwell, Oakhurst Baptist Church

Rev. Patrick Faulhaber, North Decatur United Methodist Church

Rev. Phil E. Foster, LPC North Decatur Psychotherapy Center

Rev. Dr. Steven Good, All Souls Fellowship

Rev. Tom Hagood, Columbia Presbyterian Church

Rev. Trace Haythore, ACPE, Inc.

Rev. Mark Horak, S.J, St. Thomas More Catholic Church

Rev. Dr. David Jordan, First Baptist Church Decatur

Rev. Kristen Koger, First Baptist Decatur

Rev. Caroline Leach, Presbytery of Greater Atlanta

Rev. David Lewicki, North Decatur Presbyterian Church

Pastor Kelsey Lewis, First Baptist Decatur

Rev. Josh Linman, Common Table Decatur

Rev. Dr. Larry Minnix, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Ellen Echols Purdum, Holy Trinity Parish Episcopal Church

Rev. Laura Rappold, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Allison Rhodes, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Sara Robb-Scott, Scott Boulevard Baptist Church

Rev. Alex Rodgers, Decatur Presbyterian Church

Rev. Dalton Rushing, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Allysen Schaaf, Decatur Presbyterian Church

Rev. Karen Bryant Shipp, Oakhurst Baptist Church

Rev. Dr. Greg Smith Scott Boulevard Baptist Church

Rev. Elwood H. Spackman, Decatur First United Methodist Church

Rev. Dr. Todd Speed, Decatur Presbyterian Church

Rev. Mary Anona Stoops, North Decatur Presbyterian Church

Rev. Anna M. Strickland, First Christian Church of Decatur (Disciples of Christ)

Rev. Jenna Faith Strizak, Holy Trinity Parish Episcopal Church

Rev. Nibs Stroupe, Presbytery of Greater Atlanta

Rev. Greg Tallant, Holy Trinity Parish Episcopal Church

Rev. Paul Turner, Gentle Spirit Christian Church

Rev. Melanie Vaughn-West, Oakhurst Baptist Church

Rev. Dr. Paul Wallace, First Baptist Church of Decatur

Rev. Elizabeth Waltemath, North Decatur Presbyterian Church

Rev. Shelley Woodruff, First Baptist Decatur

This Week’s Message

WELCOME TO THE NEW WEEK

“Real wisdom, God’s wisdom, begins with a holy life and is characterized by getting along with others. It is gentle and reasonable, overflowing with mercy and blessings, not hot one day and cold the next, not two-faced. You can develop a healthy, robust community that lives right with God and enjoy its results only if you do the hard work of getting along with each other, treating each other with dignity and honor.”  James 3:17-18 (MSG)

This Week’s Message

WELCOME TO THE NEW WEEK

“Don’t fool yourself into thinking that you are a listener when you are anything but, letting the Word go in one ear and out the other. Act on what you hear! Those who hear and don’t act are like those who glance in the mirror, walk away, and two minutes later have no idea who they are, what they look like.”  James 1:22-24 (MSG)